My Take on the Newest IDG Brief – Pennsylvania Genealogy

 

When working on our family history most of us find many of our ancestors lived or passed through the state of Pennsylvania. A good number of my family lines originated or stayed for a generation or two in the Keystone State and I’ll bet that applies to you too. With a large chunk of my research centered on Pennsylvania I’ve found myself trying to remember websites I didn’t bookmark, databases or other research sources I’ve used in the past. You know how it is. You research a family line hard, then put it down for a while and when you come back to it, it’s difficult to pick up where you left off.

Recently I received “Pennsylvania Genealogy” written by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. It’s an In-Brief from IDG and the newest addition to the collection of The In-Depth Genealogist. Turns out “Pennsylvania Genealogy” is just what I needed as I work on my Pennsylvania families.

This guide is chock full of information. In fact I’m surprised at how much is in this four page guide. There’s very little unused space, with sections on Research Strategies to Vital Record Substitutes, Tax Records to Directories. This guide gave me several new sites to research, many I had no idea existed. There are plenty of hard core, fact filled research sites listed, but Powell also includes Online Communities, Organizations and Societies and Facebook pages related to Pennsylvania research. I especially love digging into these extras as I research. I found the Books, Periodicals & Articles section had titles I wasn’t aware of and am interested in investigating.

I’m really happy with this newest brief from IDG. I like having a list of compiled resources ready for me so I can jump into my research. I used the .pdf version of the guide but I’ll also purchase the laminated version. As much as I’d like to go paperless I find having a hard copy of my research log and IDG brief next to my laptop helps my focus as a researcher. That way I’m not switching between a number of open tabs which is distracting for my monkey brain.

With a good number of my ancestors traveling through Pennsylvania I found “Pennsylvania Genealogy” by Elissa Scalise Powell a great resource. I’ve been researching my Pennsylvania people for a while and found new, really helpful info in this IDG brief.

This guide can be downloaded as a .pdf for just $2.75 or bought in a laminated version for $9.95 at The In-Depth Genealogist.

Disclaimer: A free copy of the guide was provided for review purposes. The writer is not being compensated for her opinions.

My Civil War Ancestor was Injured 152 years ago today at the Battle of Cumberland Church

Pvt G W Lowery Co. A 81st Penn Inf

Pvt George W Lowery Co. A 81st Pennsylvania Infantry

I want to pay special tribute to my 2x great grandfather George Washington Lowery who was shot during the Battle of Cumberland Church, outside of Farmville, VA. 152 years ago today.

Just a little info on my great great grandfather, George Washington Lowery. He was drafted July 19, 1864 at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Next he was assigned to Co. A, 81st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry for three years. Born in Franklin County, PA my grandpa was a 37-year-old laborer at enlistment time. At 5 feet 9 inches tall, with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair, he was an average guy, his description was not uncommon for the time.

After a brief two-month training stint to make my “everyday man” grandfather a soldier, Lowery and the rest of the recently drafted recruits were sent to join their regiment. The 81st Pennsylvania had been mired with the rest of the Second Corps at Petersburg, Virginia, which had been under siege for months. Even though they were in the midst of war, it’s been written that many Confederate officers who lived in the area were able to slip away and visit with family and attend Sunday church services. The fighting here didn’t come in intense bursts as so many other battlefields but it was long, hard months of exhaustive trench warfare.

But soon my great great grandfather learned the true magnitude of war. His regiment pulled out of Petersburg and was involved in what is known as Lee’s Retreat.

He was part of the pursuit of Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia, west across the state, in the final week of the war. The experiences this regiment endured would hardened any soldier. This was the time George experienced the full impact of fighting.

The nine months dug in at Petersburg probably did not prepare him for sleeping only moments at a time, the constant skirmishes and out-right battles. His regiment continually moving, marching with the weight of supplies and a rifle. Smoke so heavy in the air an infantryman couldn’t see where his bullet hit if it hit anything at all.

The regiment found sporadic food consumption a luxury. Yet above all that – experiencing those you’d come to depend on, your fellow soldiers, your friends, ripped apart by flying shrapnel. The thud of a minie-ball as it plunges into a human body. The yelling, cursing, and then slow moans as the injured soon become casualties. It was during this time my great great grandfather came to know the full meaning of war.

There was the fighting at White Oak Road, where the Confederates prevailed. The battle at Sutherland Station was a union triumph due in great part to the fighting of the 81st. The battle at Sailor’s Creek was some of the bloodiest fighting of the war, yet recognition has been lost to the surrender at Appomattox, which was only three days later. There was the skirmish at High Bridge, reminiscent of a modern day movie.

Then just outside Farmville, on April 7, 1865, the Battle of Cumberland Church took place, where George Washington Lowery was wounded. As the 81st Pennsylvania, 2nd NYHA and part of the 5th NH encountered Confederate soldiers entrenched upon the ridge surrounding a church, intense fighting broke out. A minie-ball struck my great great grandfather in the chest, one and a fourth inches below the right nipple. The ball traveled through his body, ranging downward and lodged against the skin about a half inch right of his backbone, where it was taken out by an Army Surgeon the day after he was shot.

Transferred to Carver Hospital in Washington DC my grandfather recuperated there for two months. He was honorably discharged with a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability June 5, 1865, and went home to his wife and children back in Franklin County, PA.

I want to dedicate this post to you George Washington Lowery, my great great grandpa. I want to honor you and just let you know I’m so proud of you and so glad I have the honor of being your descendant.

James Hayes Marshall Jr – the patriarch of the Marshalls of Monroe Township, Allen County, Ohio

Hays Marshall aka James Hayes Marshall

James Hays Marshall                     aka Hayes Marshall


This is my great-great grandfather James Hayes Marshall Jr. and like the title says, the patriarch of the Marshalls of Monroe Township, Allen County, Ohio.

James was born 9 April 1823 to James Hayes Marshall Sr. and Nancy Jane Patterson. James Sr. was a War of 1812 veteran which would come to have an affect on Jr.’s adult life.

James Jr. was one of seven children who all lived and farmed in Little Beaver Township, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. He and his twin William were his parent’s fourth and fifth babies. As happened all too often during these times James’ mother Nancy died in 1829 the same year she gave birth to her seventh child. James was only six years old.

James Sr. remarried in 1834. With his new wife Mary Slaven they added three more children to the family. This same scenario would be replayed in James Jr.’s adult life as well.

My great-great grandfather James Jr. married Nancy Painter Steele on 22 January 1826 in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. They had eight children. The first three were born in Lawrence County, PA. The family then moved to Vinton County, Ohio where two more children were born and the last three were born in Allen County, Ohio.

James Jr. and his wife Nancy purchased property in Vinton County along with James’s sister and brother-in-law. The Marshalls stayed in Vinton County long enough to produce two children. Father James Sr. had received land for his service in the War of 1812 and gave these parcels to his five sons. Which is why James Jr. and his family left Vinton County and ended up in Allen County, Ohio.

James Jr. farmed and raised his family of eight in Allen County until tragedy struck in 1863 when his wife Nancy died. Just as his father before him James had a house full of children to raise without their mother and just as his father before him he remarried.

Susannah Van Meter became his new wife on 15 January 1864 and brought her own son into their family as well as bearing four more children. My great grandfather George S Marshall was one of those last four children.

James H Marshall Death card

James H Marshall Death card

James Jr. continued to farm the rest of his life. He died 10 February 1888 at the age of 64 years old. He was buried in Rockport cemetery in Allen County, Ohio next to his first wife Nancy.

Now this is pure speculation on my part but I sense James Jr. and Susannah’s marriage was one of convenience. He needed a woman in his home for his children and Susannah had an out-of-wedlock child making her undesirable to most men. Susannah was 30 yrs old when she married James Jr. I think her prospects of marriage were dimming, so she took what she could get. After James Jr.’s death the older children continued farming and Susannah left the family home and lived with my great grandfather George for nearly the rest of her life.

In many ways there seems to be a disconnect between the older and younger children of James Hayes Marshall Jr. but again that is a feeling I have and not proven fact, although it is something I will continue to research! It really doesn’t matter what I turn up. It’s a good thing James Jr. married Susannah. That union is vital for me being here today!

Thanks for reading the story of my great-great grandfather James Hayes Marshall Jr.

William Holmes – My 3x great granddad

William Holmes

William Holmes

WILLIAM HOLMES is my 3x great grandfather on my maternal side. He was born 25 April 1810, in Carroll County, Ohio. William was the oldest son of Obadiah and Rebecca (Thomas) Holmes, who both came from Virginia.

As one of Obadiah and Rebecca’s eight children he married Margaret Jenkins (Junkins) on 2 September 1830 in Tuscarawas County, OH. While living in Tuscarawas County located in eastern Ohio, William and Margaret had nine children. Their second child, daughter Rebecca (Holmes Williams) is my 2x great grandmother.

William farmed pretty much his entire life. By the early 1860s he and nearly his entire family moved to Allen County, Ohio. This exodus west across the state included several of his older children, already married besides the kids still at home. At least two of Williams’ siblings made the move and his parents Obadiah and Rebecca. I find this astonishing because both Obadiah and Rebecca had to be around 82 or 83 years old when they moved.

I guess no one was left in Tuscarawas County to care for the old folks so they had to move too. Accompanying the Holmes family in the great move was the Williams family. Two of William Holmes daughters, my 2x great grandmother Rebecca and Hannah (Anna) married into the Williamsfamily.

Holmes Land Liberty Township Hardin County Ohio

Holmes Land Liberty Township Hardin County Ohio

This great migration is going to be the focus of my genealogy research. Two dozen families from infants to 80 year olds moved 175 miles across Ohio. Why? Better farm land? Was there an epidemic? Did the Civil War have anything to do with it? It’s time I do a little research to find out!

William and Margaret lived in Allen County until 1874, when they moved to Liberty Township in Hardin County, OH just a few miles east. I found where William and Margaret lived in Hardin County on an 1870s plat map. My genea-sister and I made the 30 minute drive and wandered the area where they lived. I am very fortunate to be able to walk in my ancestors footsteps almost whenever I want.

William Holmes Property in Hardin County Ohio

William Holmes Property in Hardin County Ohio

According to the History of Hardin County, William and Margaret were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which he had attended since 1829. He was a Class Leader for twenty-five years and was Steward and Trustee. William Holmes, three sons, six sons-in-law and seven grandsons were all Republicans.(1)

William died at the age of 82 on December 22, 1892 in Allen County, Ohio.

Thanks for reading about my 3x great grandfather William Holmes. If you have a Holmes in your family tree email me at cindy@genealogycircledotcom.

Let’s share info. I’d love to hear from you!

William Holmes Property/Cemetery

There’s a cemetery on William Holmes’ property

(1)The History of Hardin County, Ohio: Containing a History of the County, Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc., General and Local Statistics, Military Record, Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men, History of the Northwest Territory, History of Ohio, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co. 1883, online, Google Books, http://books.google.com/books?id=aNQ4AQAAMAAJ pg 1005, 27 March 2012

Do you think my great-grandfather was a mama’s boy?

Marshall Home Place

 

You know how us family historians talk about putting flesh and bones on our ancestors? We love the the thought of discovering their daily lives. We want to see them as “real people” and find out what they were really like.

 

One way I’ve found to do that is through newspapers. They’re a fantastic source for understanding the setting of our ancestors daily lives. Even if our ancestors aren’t named, newspapers will have documented major local events that certainly affected our people’s lives. Better yet are newspapers from smaller communities, which printed the most mundane events. The stuff real life is made of!

Another great benefit? A newspaper search will reveal the names of lots of your ancestors’ friends and family too. Remember FAN club research?

In Northwest Ohio we have a fabulous resource in Bowling Green State University. Their Center for Archival Collections has a huge collection of historic newspapers. Check out their website. It’s worth the drive if you are close.

So awhile back my sister Betsy and I spent a day at BGSU. Our goal was to find a particular obit, but we struck out. It wasn’t a total loss though. We did find in the Lima, Ohio Times-Democrat an interesting slice of life concerning our great-grandparents.

 

The snippet read:
Mrs. Susan Marshall, of whose serious fall mention was made some weeks ago, was removed to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Stella Everitt, Monday of last week owing to the serious and finally fatal illness of Mrs. George Marshall, with whom she made her home.

 

 

Beside an incredibly long run-on sentence, we found our g-g-grandmother Susannah Van Meter lived with her son my great-grandfather George S. Marshall, and his wife my great-grandmother Mary Ellen Williams. Now I find that interesting as heck!!

Why would Susannah live with her son, instead of a nearby daughter until after she fell? George and Mary Ellen had young children at home. So Mary Ellen’s hands were full with her home/farm and children. I’d just think Susannah would live with Stella to begin with! Don’t you? Do you think my great-grandfather was a mama’s boy?

It’s a really cool bit of family info. I’ve twirled it around in my head several times. Whatever their reasons I have a little more flesh on the bones of these ancestors and look forward to finding lots more!