Taking a look at IDG’s newest In-Brief Research Guide: “Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure”

I was cleaning off my desk after the holidays. With all the baking, gift buying and decorating my genealogy research and a lot of life took a back seat. Everything got stacked on my desk to make room for holiday merriment.

Now that life has returned to a normal schedule I began to sort through the piles of papers on my desk.  A lot of it was research related and I realized I have a lot of family history information. Also a lot of it is stacked in piles. I really should do something with all this material. Try to compile it or share it somehow.

Then in one of those weird life coincidences I got the chance to review IDG’s newest In-Brief Research Guide: “Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure.” This In-Brief Guide spoke to me in a big way.

Christine Woodcock is the author of the guide and outlines the situation. “As the family historian, you have collected a cornucopia of research documents: bits of scrap paper, newspaper clippings, photos, obits, e-mails and other assorted bits of research. What can you do to preserve these documents and the stories they tell for future generations?”

That’s exactly what I had been thinking!

Christine goes on to say, “Turn your family tree information into a treasured family heirloom, a family history book.”

Hmmm, I’m less enthusiastic now. I love the idea of a family history book but that’s a pretty big project. Where do I start? What family do I choose? How much of my info do I include? I don’t know how to lay out a book. I nearly talked myself out of the project before I got to the guide’s second paragraph.

Woodcock knows her stuff and answered my questions and lots more. She gives the reader detailed steps on how to put your family history book together.  Starting with choosing who the book is going to be about like, “One ancestor, one branch, one line,” to gathering the material for your book. She touches on tender subjects like “Dealing with the skeletons and scandals.”

Christine is precise and thorough taking the reader through all the steps needed to put together a valuable family history. She breaks each section down to manageable, workable segments. As I continue to read the guide I’m thinking I can do this.

The author finishes by covering publishing. She discusses hard cover books, ebooks, or photo books and how to go about using each method. There are also additional resources listed. The reader gets even more insights on writing and publishing. By the time I finished the guide I knew if I followed this outline I could put together a family history book. My own family history book. No excuses, and if I pulled out the I don’t have time cop-out, Christine provided the perfect answer in a quote from J. Jackson Brown.

“Don’t say you don’t have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein.”

Well, if you put it that way, I can and should put together a family history book. With the help of “Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure” it’s doable. You can find the In-Brief Reasearch Guide at http://theindepthgenealogist.com/product/brief-guide-turning-family-tree-family-treasure/ I think you’ll find it exceptionally helpful too.

IDG Introduces their Newest In-Brief Research Guide: “Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure” By Christine Woodcock

The In-Depth Genealogist (IDG) is pleased to present their newest in-brief research guide in the research series by writer, Christine Woodcock, entitled “An In-Brief Guide to Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure”. Christine wrote the column “In Search of Your Scottish Roots” for The In-Depth Genealogist’s digital magazine, Going In-Depth. Scottish born, Canadian raised, she is a genealogy educator with an expertise in Scottish records. She enjoys sharing new resources to assist others in their quest to find and document their heritage. Christine is also a lecturer, author and blogger. She is the Director of Genealogy Tours of Scotland
and enjoys taking fellow Scots “home” to do onsite genealogy research and to discover their own Scottish heritage.

As the family historian, you have collected a cornucopia of research documents: bits of scrap paper, newspaper clippings, photos, obits, e-mails and other assorted bits of “research”. What can you do to preserve these documents and the stories they tell for future generations? Turn your family tree information into a treasured family heirloom, a family history book. In this In-Brief, Christine shares tips on how to start, develop the content, interview relatives, share your own story, and determine your book format. There are also recommended websites, publishers, and resource books within the guide.

“An In-Brief Guide to Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure” is available now as a PDF ($2.75). Pre-orders of the printed laminated guide, 8.5” x 11” ($9.95 + shipping) are through The In-Depth Genealogist Store (http://theindepthgenealogist.com/shop-idg/idg-products/).  IDG has published fifteen guides which are all available as 4-page PDFs and laminated print versions. Subscribers to the digital magazine, Going In-Depth, receive a 10% discount on purchase of each guide.

Sultana: An Unimaginable Tragedy 152 Years Ago Today

Sultana taken at Helena, AR, on April 26, 1865, a day before she was destroyed. The view captures a large crowd of paroled Union prisoners packed tightly together on the steamboat’s decks.
Photo Credit: Bankes, Thomas W. Photographer, 26 Apr 1865. Sultana [digital image]. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(steamboat)#/media/File:Civil_War_Steamer_Sultana_tintype,_1865.png


By April 1865 citizens had grown accustomed to big news events but this month was filled with even more outstanding headlines than usual.

On April 9th, Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to U.S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse, signaling the first step in the end of the Civil War.

Shocking the nation, President Abraham Lincoln was shot April 14th and died April 15th from the assassin’s bullet. His murderer John Wilkes Booth was shot and killed on April 26th.

April 27th saw Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrender his army to Gen. William T. Sherman and his Union troops in North Carolina. Yet buried in the backs of most newspapers would be one of the single most tragic events of the Civil War. The explosion of the riverboat Sultana.

For a little background, the Sultana was built in Cincinnati in 1863. She ran in the most southern part of the Mississippi River, used mainly for transporting cotton but she was also known to carry U.S. Army officers and soldiers between ports along the river.

On April 21, 1865 the Sultana was docked in New Orleans. She was being loaded with sugar and livestock. There were a few passengers boarded in the 100 cabins of the steamer. By law the Sultana could carry 376 persons which included the crew. Leaving New Orleans on April 24th the Sultana headed for Vicksburg, Mississippi which was a regular stop on her route. While docked in Vicksburg the ship’s captain discovered the Sultana’s boilers were leaking. The repair normally should have taken three to four days yet was completed in a single day. The rush to finish the repair was easy to figure out. In a single word – money.

Ship lines were paid five dollars a head by the government to transport Union soldiers back north. The men about to aboard the Sultana we’re headed to Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio where they would be mustered out of the army. If the Sultana stayed in dock a couple extra days soldiers anxious to make the trip home would find other ships to make the journey. The repair crew rushed to fix the Sultana’s boilers to get the ship back en route and not lose out on this easy cash.

It’s estimated that 2,300 people were aboard the Sultana when it left Vicksburg. This was six times the number of people it was supposed to carry. In fact crew members had to bolster the second floor deck to keep it from caving in from the weight of so many people.

Recently released Union prisoners of war comprised most of the passengers. Liberated from Cahaba, Alabama and Andersonville, Georgia prisons they were being housed at Union Camp Fisk outside of Vicksburg. From there they would board ships heading north on the Mississippi River. Finally these POWs, recently released from their hellish prison experience would be headed home. After enduring so much in prison camps, being overcrowded on a steamer going home didn’t seem so bad. Many of the men were weakened, ill and in such bad shape their only thought was to get home.

The exact number of soldiers on the Sultana was never known. The ship was so crammed with passengers that it was decided not to make out muster rolls in advance. Roll would be taken once the ship was underway.

Once the Sultana left Vicksburg she made her way north on the Mississippi River, stopping at several smaller ports unloading cargo. The river was high for this time of year with a fast moving current. There had been a lot of rain recently. The steamer, with the extraordinary number of passengers strained to get through the churning waters.

It was late afternoon on April 26th when the Sultana docked at Memphis. Here some of the soldiers, went ashore to get off the overcrowded ship and do some sightseeing. The recently repaired boilers started leaking again and were quickly patched once more so the steamer could get underway. Some of the soldiers who got off the ship did not get back in time and missed boarding the Sultana as it pulled out of Memphis around 7 pm. These men would soon learn that being late probably saved their lives.

It was about 2 am April 27, 1865. The Sultana was just a few miles north of Memphis, straining against the powerful river currents with hastily repaired boilers when the unthinkable happened. The boilers, stretched to their limit, with the extra weight and churning waters, burst. With unbelievable force the explosion, escaping steam and fire tore the mid section out of the ship. The blast was so loud and flames shot so high in the sky it was seen and heard back in Memphis.

Soldiers, presumably sleeping at that early morning hour, were blasted into the air, then plummeted into the cold April waters of the Mississippi. Some were scalded by the boilers hot steam, others burned by fiery debris. Still others clung to the ship’s remnants or were trapped aboard as the disaster continued to unfold. They too were forced to jump into the river as fire consumed the part of ship they clung to. The Mississippi was littered with the bobbing heads of passengers as they desperately tried to stay afloat. These soldiers were weak from their POW experience. The effort it took to swim, if they knew how or to hang on to whatever they could find floating was too much for most. Battered, burned and scalded they slipped beneath the water’s surface drowning in the Mississippi River. Tragically they were only a few days from reaching home.

By morning, ships of all sizes had arrived at the scene from Memphis, pulling survivors from the river and picking up those who made it to shore. It was estimated that somewhere between 500 and 600 men were taken to Memphis hospitals. About 200 of those survivors died soon afterward either from their injuries, exposure or their weakened condition. It really isn’t known how many people died in the explosion since their wasn’t an accurate list of passengers but it’s generally accepted 1,700 perished although some published accounts put the number at 1,800. To put this horrible incident into perspective 1,754 Union soldiers died at Shiloh.

The Sultana, alarmingly overcrowded with passengers, struggling against unusually high waters, with hastily repaired boilers, exploded and caught fire in the worst maritime tragedy of our country’s history. More passengers died in the Sultana explosion than the sinking of the Titanic. Making it even more heartbreaking is the fact that most of the dead were Union prisoners of war. Men who had survived Andersonville and Cahaba prisons and were finally headed home to their families. May they always be remembered and rest in peace.

My Take on the Newest IDG Brief – Pennsylvania Genealogy


When working on our family history most of us find many of our ancestors lived or passed through the state of Pennsylvania. A good number of my family lines originated or stayed for a generation or two in the Keystone State and I’ll bet that applies to you too. With a large chunk of my research centered on Pennsylvania I’ve found myself trying to remember websites I didn’t bookmark, databases or other research sources I’ve used in the past. You know how it is. You research a family line hard, then put it down for a while and when you come back to it, it’s difficult to pick up where you left off.

Recently I received “Pennsylvania Genealogy” written by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. It’s an In-Brief from IDG and the newest addition to the collection of The In-Depth Genealogist. Turns out “Pennsylvania Genealogy” is just what I needed as I work on my Pennsylvania families.

This guide is chock full of information. In fact I’m surprised at how much is in this four page guide. There’s very little unused space, with sections on Research Strategies to Vital Record Substitutes, Tax Records to Directories. This guide gave me several new sites to research, many I had no idea existed. There are plenty of hard core, fact filled research sites listed, but Powell also includes Online Communities, Organizations and Societies and Facebook pages related to Pennsylvania research. I especially love digging into these extras as I research. I found the Books, Periodicals & Articles section had titles I wasn’t aware of and am interested in investigating.

I’m really happy with this newest brief from IDG. I like having a list of compiled resources ready for me so I can jump into my research. I used the .pdf version of the guide but I’ll also purchase the laminated version. As much as I’d like to go paperless I find having a hard copy of my research log and IDG brief next to my laptop helps my focus as a researcher. That way I’m not switching between a number of open tabs which is distracting for my monkey brain.

With a good number of my ancestors traveling through Pennsylvania I found “Pennsylvania Genealogy” by Elissa Scalise Powell a great resource. I’ve been researching my Pennsylvania people for a while and found new, really helpful info in this IDG brief.

This guide can be downloaded as a .pdf for just $2.75 or bought in a laminated version for $9.95 at The In-Depth Genealogist.

Disclaimer: A free copy of the guide was provided for review purposes. The writer is not being compensated for her opinions.

My Civil War Ancestor was Injured 152 years ago today at the Battle of Cumberland Church

Pvt G W Lowery Co. A 81st Penn Inf

Pvt George W Lowery Co. A 81st Pennsylvania Infantry

I want to pay special tribute to my 2x great grandfather George Washington Lowery who was shot during the Battle of Cumberland Church, outside of Farmville, VA. 152 years ago today.

Just a little info on my great great grandfather, George Washington Lowery. He was drafted July 19, 1864 at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Next he was assigned to Co. A, 81st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry for three years. Born in Franklin County, PA my grandpa was a 37-year-old laborer at enlistment time. At 5 feet 9 inches tall, with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair, he was an average guy, his description was not uncommon for the time.

After a brief two-month training stint to make my “everyday man” grandfather a soldier, Lowery and the rest of the recently drafted recruits were sent to join their regiment. The 81st Pennsylvania had been mired with the rest of the Second Corps at Petersburg, Virginia, which had been under siege for months. Even though they were in the midst of war, it’s been written that many Confederate officers who lived in the area were able to slip away and visit with family and attend Sunday church services. The fighting here didn’t come in intense bursts as so many other battlefields but it was long, hard months of exhaustive trench warfare.

But soon my great great grandfather learned the true magnitude of war. His regiment pulled out of Petersburg and was involved in what is known as Lee’s Retreat.

He was part of the pursuit of Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia, west across the state, in the final week of the war. The experiences this regiment endured would hardened any soldier. This was the time George experienced the full impact of fighting.

The nine months dug in at Petersburg probably did not prepare him for sleeping only moments at a time, the constant skirmishes and out-right battles. His regiment continually moving, marching with the weight of supplies and a rifle. Smoke so heavy in the air an infantryman couldn’t see where his bullet hit if it hit anything at all.

The regiment found sporadic food consumption a luxury. Yet above all that – experiencing those you’d come to depend on, your fellow soldiers, your friends, ripped apart by flying shrapnel. The thud of a minie-ball as it plunges into a human body. The yelling, cursing, and then slow moans as the injured soon become casualties. It was during this time my great great grandfather came to know the full meaning of war.

There was the fighting at White Oak Road, where the Confederates prevailed. The battle at Sutherland Station was a union triumph due in great part to the fighting of the 81st. The battle at Sailor’s Creek was some of the bloodiest fighting of the war, yet recognition has been lost to the surrender at Appomattox, which was only three days later. There was the skirmish at High Bridge, reminiscent of a modern day movie.

Then just outside Farmville, on April 7, 1865, the Battle of Cumberland Church took place, where George Washington Lowery was wounded. As the 81st Pennsylvania, 2nd NYHA and part of the 5th NH encountered Confederate soldiers entrenched upon the ridge surrounding a church, intense fighting broke out. A minie-ball struck my great great grandfather in the chest, one and a fourth inches below the right nipple. The ball traveled through his body, ranging downward and lodged against the skin about a half inch right of his backbone, where it was taken out by an Army Surgeon the day after he was shot.

Transferred to Carver Hospital in Washington DC my grandfather recuperated there for two months. He was honorably discharged with a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability June 5, 1865, and went home to his wife and children back in Franklin County, PA.

I want to dedicate this post to you George Washington Lowery, my great great grandpa. I want to honor you and just let you know I’m so proud of you and so glad I have the honor of being your descendant.